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Seth Dyer discusses his two new singles & how he operates his rap career on “No Budget”

Toronto, ON – Toronto artist Seth Dyer just kicked off the week by launching two new singles: “No Budget” and “Should Be Us.”

“Should Be Us” is an emotive, all-too-relatable track about unrequited love. Seth usually produces all of his music solo dolo, but he enlisted the help of Zepfire for this one. The result is a very sadboy song that will get you all caught up in feels and thinking about your ex.

“No Budget” is a track about the DIY approach to coming up as a rapper. The reality of the situation is that most of the guys coming up in the rap game don’t have a ton of coin to throw at their careers. And as much as guys love to floss and flex, a lot of it is a facade. Seth approaches the track with a genuine honesty, and delivers a real-talk rendition of what it’s like to make moves with no budget, and to be completely self-reliant and self-sufficient. And obviously this track was self-produced.

Take in “No Budget” and “Should Be Us” after the jump, and scope our in-depth interview with Seth to find out more about his new releases and how he operates on “No Budget.”

Seth Dyer discusses his two new singles & how to elevate your rap career with minimal funds - HipHopCanada.com
Photo by @onlyoneminzi

“…you have to take the iniative to do all the tasks required of an artist on your own until you have people in place to do them for you.”
– Seth Dyer

“No Budget”

Seth Dyer discusses his two new singles & how to elevate your rap career with minimal funds - HipHopCanada.com


“Should Be Us”

Seth Dyer discusses his two new singles & how to elevate your rap career with minimal funds - HipHopCanada.com



Q&A: Seth Dyer

HipHopCanada: As always, start off by telling me about the significance of each one of these songs to you on a personal level.

Seth Dyer: “No Budget” has been my reality for a little while now. As things move further in my career things get more expensive, I currently don’t have access to a huge cash flow (although I feel I eventually will) so we’ve had to learn how to make moves off of the strength of my music. “Should Be Us” is a story I think everyone can relate to but for me it’s not a current reality… it’s a story from my past.

HipHopCanada: Explain the reasoning behind dropping these two tracks together. One track is about unrequited love, and the other one is about the importance of getting shit done yourself. Those are two very different waves.

Seth Dyer: I actually put snippets of each song up on instagram and asked people to vote on what my next release should be. The vote ended up being a tie so I released both. Originally I was just going to release “Should Be Us” but then I recorded no budget and I really wanted people to hear it. I’m glad there is such a contrast to the records though. It shows different sides of my artistry.

HipHopCanada: On that note… I feel like the contrast between the two tracks makes a very important commentary. We claim we’re “independent” or “self-sufficient” or whatever… but no one can actually be a complete lone wolf. Because on the relational side of things, there’s that need to have someone else there.

Seth Dyer: Funny how that connection is there I honestly didn’t think about that but you’re absolutely right. We need to have a sense of independence but we still crave that need for connection.

HipHopCanada: I appreciate the realness of “No Budget” because I think that’s a reality for so many up-and-comers. Guy’s aren’t budgeting, and guys (usually) don’t have the cash flow to properly fund their rap careers. What would your advice be for artists on the come-up who don’t have a budget? How are you making your moves with minimal funds?

Seth Dyer: I feel like “No Budget” is a reality for a lot of people, not just artists. But there are ways to fund things in Canada through grants. We’re looking into those options now. But just because you don’t have a huge cash flow, doesn’t mean you can’t have success. Make sure your content is stellar, that you believe in your content and find creative ways to market your content. I’m making moves with minimal funds by staying consistent with my music, my branding and my promotion. I’ve also had to teach myself a lot about the business. And you have to take the iniative to do all the tasks required of an artist on your own until you have people in place to do them for you.

HipHopCanada: “No Budget” was self-produced (of course – because it’s all about self-reliance), but you teamed up with Zepfire for the beat on “Should Be Us.” Walk me through that creative process, and what you each contributed to the production.

Seth Dyer: Zepfire and I were both at the studio. He was supposed to be working with somebody but they didn’t end up showing up so I took some time to mix “Should Be Us.” At that time I thought it was done, Zep asked if he could just sit in the room and I was like “no problem”! So I’m playing through the song and mixing and Zep asked if he could add some stuff and if I like it I can keep it and if I don’t it can go. So I said “sure”. He did some work to the drums I already had and he added that dope guitar part. He’s a super talented dude. I liked what he did so I kept it. He really helped increase the emotion of the record.

HipHopCanada: I’m curious as to what inspired you to write “Should Be Us”.

Seth Dyer: “Should Be Us” is really a mixture of my past and what I think that other people may have experienced. It’s not a reality for me now, but sometimes I go back to certain moments in my life for inspiration. I draw inspiration from my stories and the stories of others.


Twitter: @SethDyer_EV

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Sarah Jay

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Sarah Jay is HipHopCanada's Associate Editor in Chief. Sarah is based in Calgary and works as a freelance journalist and photographer. Sarah is also a former A&R talent scout for the Universal Music Scouting Program, and runs a vintage store during the day. Sarah has juried the JUNO Awards, The Polaris Music Prize, and The Prism Prize. She has been fortunate enough to interview and photograph some of hip-hop's greatest influencers including Future, ScHoolboy Q, Ghostface Killah, Moka Only, Maestro Fresh Wes, Shad, Joey Bada$$, Mac Miller, and more. Follow Sarah on Twitter: @ThisIsSarahJay

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